Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Just Color Me Mauve

I've been downloading some Art Nouveau images recently, and I thought I might share some with you.


Here's a pin that Rene Lalique made for Sarah Bernhardt. Only she could get away with wearing this.






Here's another piece of jewelry by Lalique. I doubt even the Divine Sarah would dare to wear this one.






This is a piece of furniture by Emile Galle. I'm not quite sure what this is, but it looks very expensive with exotic woods and intarsia work. I'm sure it was for displaying Art Nouveau tchochkes by Emile Galle and Lalique.






Now we're getting into "too much" territory. This is a staircase designed by Victor Horta.






This is a dining room designed by Alexander Charpentier. Was anyone meant to sit down to a meal here? I doubt it. Imagine trying to eat Jell-O in this room.






Art Nouveau excess that is so excessive that it's transcendent; Antonio Gaudi's Casa Mila in Barcelona.






A wrought iron balcony from the Casa Mila






A staircase in the Casa Mila.




And most amazing of all, the roof of the Casa Mila




The Germans called it Jugendstil, but it was the same Art Nouveau nuttiness. Here are two old photos of the Elvira Studio in Munich designed by August Endell. One of the photos is colorized because Endell painted the outside in different pastel colors regularly.









Here is the interior of the Elvira Studio. It was a portrait photography business. It looks like Nosferatu's Munich apartment.
You didn't think something like this would get by Hitler's culture police or Allied bombs did you? There's not a scrap of it left.


Oscar Wilde coughs into his mauve handkerchief and exclaims that this is all just too ... too!

6 comments:

susan s. said...

Fantastique!!

JCF said...

Awesome. (Still more of an Art Deco fan, but Le Nouveau c'est exceptionale!)

JCF said...

Re the Charpentier: as dining room? Non.

As opium den? Oui!

Ciss B said...

Art Nouveau is really something, and Gaudi's creations really boggle the mind.

I am more of an Arts and Crafts movement fan. I think it's stood the test of time better - and of course I am just more into that quiet subdued and warm look.

F.L. Wright and L.C. Tiffany were fabulous in their tight yet soft interpretations of architecture and everyday stained glass as well as personal art.

Gustav Stickley was a fabulous furniture maker, too.

David G. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
myrtlewood said...

My dear CL, you must stop by when you are through with your tour. I've just had our tortoise inlaid with amethyst.